April 6, 2010

Kittens Under Pews


Both of these New York Times writers assume that the practitioners of “squeaky-clean, well-made, intellectually decorous takes on that unruly early ’70s mix of Conceptual, Process, Performance, installation and language-based art that is most associated with the label Post-Minimalism” are actually producing valid, well-intentioned expansions of the afore-mentioned. Such is clearly not the case with the shallow, derivative work of Gabriel Orozco, Urs Fischer and Tino Sehgal that Roberta Smith mentions. (Roni Horn gets a “pass” for the moment.) Kitty Kraus and Latifa Echakhch, meanwhile, are recycling ideas from Carl Andre, Richard Serra and Felix Gonzalez-Torres. (I think Lucas Knipscher bears further watching.)

There would be a lot more to complain about if there were a decided curatorial shift toward well-conceived, historically relevant exhibitions of this “Post-Minimalism.” However, those museums charged with privileging the various “takes on that unruly early ’70s mix of Conceptual, Process, Performance, installation and language-based art” have not spent the requisite time to research and seek out actual contributors to this modus operandi which, in any case, I prefer to call postconceptualism.


Image: Lucas Knipscher, The Back Is As Big As The Front [detail], 2010. 4 yards of 100 white 2 x 2 in. Heritage Buffalo Hunting Plaid from Woolrich Fabrics, Woodrich, PA; One-Way/Two-Way Mirror Window Film with Silk Screen of Heritage Buffalo Hunting Plaid 101 1.25 x 1 1.5 in. B; Heritage Buffalo Hunting Plaid 101 White 1.25 x 1.5 in. B Photocopied on Greyback Canvas; Four Texts from Camera Lucida by Roland Barthes (Removed from Four Sheets of Vinyl); Two Photographs from the Seattle Arts Commission Photo Survey by Larry Fink in the Collection of the Smithsonian and the Collection of Woolrich Woolen Mills (WP Lavori and Corso srl, Bologna), dimensions variable.
[Thanks to Andrew Russeth for alerting me to this show.]

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