March 22, 2011

Welcome, reader...

"Welcome, reader!" from Mark Cameron Boyd on Vimeo.

4 comments:

Patrick said...

Mark, I have some questions regarding the overall process. After the initial 'erasure', when people are invited to fill in the missing half or letters and words, I see that some have chosen to ignore the letters, per se, opting instead to make marks (lines, dots). Is a second erasure allowed, meaning, does it bother you that people have chosen to respond in this manner, or does it play into a suitable linguistic model? I can imagine that there is some ambiguity in how some letters were first written and then erased, allowing for new meanings to arise should a word be rewritten 'mis-spelled'. Are the non-letter marks seen in this spirit?

Mark Cameron Boyd said...

Having first divested myself of control of the “finished” state of my participatory objects, it was an easy next step to relinquish what was added by the participants. Since 2007 I have engaged in this process even though some curators and art professionals have warned that inviting public interaction with your art invites potential “trouble.” This has not been the case; public participation has imbued the “artwork” with a kind of ecstatic breath, functioning as thought extension, expansion and revelation.

Poetry became a natural vehicle for this process. The words are transformed by a delay – we can’t write fast enough but hang on what word we can – which transforms the poetic syntax through fragmentation; the poem transformed through memory’s loss.

What the participant does with shape, with spelling, with synaptic connection is not about the “correct” but instead is about the next. Meaning is (again) deferred through ego, ignored willfully, teased out and played.

Casey “read” it best: “Your new global player.”

Patrick said...

Thanks for the clarification. The divestiture is difficult for some artists, and your work is a good reminder that it is inescapable.

Justin said...

I came to this exhibit opening! Thanks to the video! I felt like I missed the point of many of the works when I came to the exhibit because I wasn't part of the performance and there was no way I knew of to reflect or know of the initial purpose of the work. The mission changed as people re-worked the project, but coming in after all of this had happened left me unknowing of any of this. So this video is a bit of a gift.